Everything you need to know about Warsaw City before you emigrate


The Polish capital dates back to the ninth century, and it has a long, eventful, and sometimes tragic history. Many who have not visited the city will connect it with the communist regimes. Still, since the victory of solidarity in 1989, the town has turned into one of the most dynamic and colorful capitals in Europe.

Due to the booming economy of the city, it's not as cheap as it has always been on western backs, but there are still plenty of great deals to find and are definitely less expensive than French, German, or Spanish cities.

One of the things that keep prices down is the variety of excellent youth hostels in Warsaw. Helvetia Inn, Nathan's Villa Inn, and Orange Inn meet the requirements for their city visibility.

In addition to offering great hostels in Warsaw, the city also has some good hotels and guest houses like Dom Literatury Hotel and Boutique Bed and Breakfast.

Old City

An important area that travelers may want to see in the Old Town. This somewhat inappropriate term has been destroyed, and the buildings displayed today have been lovingly restored to their former glory by the Polish people.

In fact, it was an excellent job as the area was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980, although most of the building was just under 30 years old.

Those planning to stay in this area may want to take a look at the Old Town apartments - your own residence with kitchen, bathroom, and an excellent location for the price of a hostel.

Beyond the old city center is the Royal Castle, King Sigismund's Column, Market Square and Barbican. In the far south is the Warsaw University campus, and it is an excellent place to visit some of the most original pubs and clubs in the city.

Nightlife and Events

As a growing city, Warsaw has something for everyone. The bars range from dark and air beverage bars to modern lounge bars. The two-story Foksal 19 is popular with spectators from the late 1920s and 1930s, while the 20Pole Mokotowskie offers an outdoor grill and live music.

There are also many clubs with Club 70 that live up to its name and offer disco classics, while Ground Zero provides a more modern look and Le Madame's totally bizarre look.

It merges into every Warsaw capital that has a large number of festivals and events, both international and domestic. Notice the international film festival in October and the carnival in March.

Another unique event is Noc Swietojanska (summer evening). At this pagan fertility festival, cute Polish girls throw wreaths in the Vistula before fireworks, music, and local food to help you party at night. Orange Inn
Poznanska provides near the station for those traveling to Warsaw to spend a good base evening.

Food

Food is something the Poles are justifiably proud of, and almost every dish is nothing but good value for money. Local specialties range from the famous beetroot soup, "Porsche," stuffed dumplings ("pierogi"), and all kinds of pork dishes. However, if you want something more international, there are plenty of different restaurants, from Chinese to Indian, and from Moroccan to Italian.
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